Film Review

Film Review: Car Wash

Car Wash movie
Photo by Adrian Dascal on Unsplash

Encyclopedia Entry

Note: I had written this film review for an encyclopedia and then the project itself got cancelled. So, I decided to upload it to my site.

Car Wash is a 1976 Universal Studios film produced by Art Linson and Gary Stromberg, directed by Michael Schultz and written by Joel Schumacher. This 97-minute musical comedy contains elements of drama and romance, with at least one reviewer calling it reminiscent of 1930s theater. This blaxploitation film, set in the Dee-Luxe Car Wash located in Los Angeles, California, covers just one day of interactions among two dozen-plus multi-racial characters, including car wash staff, their customers, people working at nearby businesses and more. Throughout the movie, employees listen to disco music from KGYS, dancing as they work, with news breaks synchronizing with car wash events in this episodic-style film.

Film Review

Guest Film Review: Hero and Villain – The Story of Martin Luther

Film Review by Ryan Sagert

film review: Martin Luther
Library of Congress: No Known Restrictions

The story of the Reformation was one of faith, politics and philosophical change, which took place in the mid-16th century in what was then and is today Germany. At its most basic, the Reformation was a movement, headed by Martin Luther to challenge the authority of the Catholic Church, then the political and religious head of Europe, for its right to sell indulgences, which was the forgiveness of sins for fiscal profit. On a historical level, the Reformation marked the end of blind faith and ushered in the age of reason. 

Film Review

Film Review: Glory

Civil War Film

Encyclopedia Entry

Note: I had written this film review for an encyclopedia and then the project itself got cancelled. So, I decided to upload it to my site.

Glory is a 1989 Civil War film that shares the story of the 54th Massachusetts Voluntary Infantry regiment, one of the first units comprised of African American soldiers. Directed by Edward Zwick, the screenplay was written by Kevin Jarre, and the film merges historical people and events with fictional characters and subplots. Its ensemble cast shares the story of this unit from its formation to its most prominent place in history: the courageous yet futile attempt to take Fort Wagner in South Carolina from the Confederates. Although the 54th Massachusetts suffered enormous casualties in this historic event, it was the impetus to numerous other African American units forming in the Union army, with nearly 200,000 black soldiers ultimately fighting in the war. Plus, their mettle under fire convinced many people that black men could fight bravely and well.